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Laser

Laser after Cataract Surgery

Sometimes the eye tissue that encloses the IOL becomes cloudy and may blur your vision. This condition is called an after-cataract. An after-cataract can develop months or years after cataract surgery.

An after-cataract is treated with a laser. Your doctor uses a laser to make a tiny hole in the eye tissue behind the lens to let light pass through. This outpatient procedure is called a YAG laser capsulotomy. It is painless and rarely results in increased eye pressure or other eye problems. As a precaution, your doctor may give you eye drops to lower your eye pressure before or after the procedure.

Laser Retina Surgery

Laser surgery is often recommended for people with macular edema, PDR, and neovascular glaucoma.

For macular edema, the laser is focused on the damaged retina near the macula to decrease the fluid leakage. The main goal of treatment is to prevent further loss of vision. It is uncommon for people who have blurred vision from macular edema to recover normal vision, although some may experience partial improvement. A few people may see the laser spots near the center of their vision following treatment. The spots usually fade with time, but may not disappear.

For PDR, the laser is focused on parts of the retina except the macula. This panretinal photocoagulation treatment causes abnormal new vessels to shrink and often prevents then from growing in the future. It also decreases the chance that vitreous bleeding or retinal distortion will occur.

Multiple laser treatments over time are sometimes necessary. Laser surgery does not cure diabetic retinopathy and does not always prevent further loss of vision.

Laser Surgery for Glaucoma

Laser surgery treatments may be recommended for different types of glaucoma. In open-angle glaucoma, the drain itself is treated. The laser is used to modify the drain (trabeculoplasty) to help control eye pressure. In closed-angle glaucoma, the laser creates a hole in the iris (irodotomy) to improve the flow of aqueous fluid to the drain.

Karen Dickes, DO
Gregory Kouri, OD
Brady Betten